Sheedy Contest: Contest Rules

Research & Education : William F. Sheedy Contest : Contest Rules

Information for:  Kids | Parents | Teachers | Contest Rules | Guidelines

Since 1990, the Middlesex County Historical Society has sponsored a contest to honor its longtime treasurer, the late William E. Sheedy.  The contest is intended to promote each student’s awareness of his or her family history.  Third-grade students in Middletown public and private schools are eligible to enter the contest.

CONTEST RULES:

  1. The contest runs from early February to early April.  Each child should submit an entry to his or her teacher by the deadline, for delivery to the Middlesex County Historical Society.  Please call to make any special arrangements.
  2. Entries must include student’s full name, address and telephone number, name of school, and teacher’s name.
  3. Entries should be submitted in essay or scrapbook format.  Entries may include photographs and copies of documents and artifacts.  Regretfully we cannot accept entries in the form of posters, videos, audiotapes, CDs, or online files. 
  4. Your last paragraph in your essay or scrapbook should be a summary.  Please write about 5 sentences to tell the most important things you learned while doing your research.  If you are a winner, you will be reading your summary paragraph at the reception.
  5. Entries will be judged on creativity, neatness and overall presentation.
  6. Entries will be considered on an individual basis.  Authors of the top-winning entries will be contacted by mail by the Middlesex County Historical Society and each will receive a $20 award.  All participants will receive a special certificate and a pencil and be invited to a special reception in their honor to be held in early June at General Mansfield House at 151 Main Street in Middletown.

QUESTIONS?  Contact the Middlesex County Historical Society at 860-346-0746 or mchs@wesleyan.edu


EVERYONE COMES FROM SOMEWHERE

Did you ever wonder about your own family?  Have you heard stories about your family from your parents or grandparents?  The people in your family who came before you are called your ANCESTORS.  When you hear stories about your ancestors you are learning about your own family history.

TELL US ABOUT ONE OF YOUR ANCESTORS 

Start by asking your parents or other family members about your family’s history. After you hear some stories, pick ONE person you would like to learn more about.  You may choose someone who is alive now, or someone who lived a long time ago.

YOU’LL PROBABLY WANT TO FIND OUT:

  • Where and when your ancestor was born and lived
  • What sort of work your ancestor did, and where he or she went to school
  • What daily life was like for your ancestor

In addition to listening to family stories, you may want to research your ancestor’s life and times by reading old letters, diaries and newspaper articles; digging out old family photographs or official documents, like birth certificates, military discharge papers or report cards; or examining heirlooms that once belonged to your ancestor.  Think about how life for your ancestor was different from or similar to your life today.

YOU MAY WANT TO TELL ABOUT SOMETHING THAT REALLY HAPPENED TO YOUR ANCESTOR, such as arriving in America for the first time, fighting in a war, getting through the Depression or surviving a hurricane or flood.  There are interesting stories in every family.

BE CREATIVE WHEN YOU TELL YOUR ANCESTOR’S STORY.
For instance, you can write a story, draw pictures or include photographs and copies of documents.  You decide the best way to introduce your ancestor.

HAVE FUN!